Volume hurdles “completely wrong,” says FBAA

by Miklos Bolza28 Apr 2017
Lender-imposed conditions that brokers write a certain number of loans per month or year to retain accreditation need to go, said Peter White, executive director of the Finance Brokers Association of Australia (FBAA).

Speaking in front of the Senate Standing Committee on Economics in a government inquiry into consumer protection in the banking, insurance and financial sector on Wednesday (26 April), White said these restrictions – called minimum volume hurdles – were reducing a broker’s ability to write loans for whatever lender they desired.

“What that creates is a very bad consumer outcome because a broker can only give guidance on loans for lenders that they’re accredited to,” he said.

These restrictions mean that while a broker may be doing the right thing for the borrower with regards to the panel of accredited lenders they have access to, there may be another outside that scope which is more suitable.

“Unfortunately they can’t reach into that because they are constrained by the aggregator’s agreements and those accreditations. That’s generally restricted because they don’t have volumes to reach that lender,” he told the panel.

“Those sorts of things need to go.”

White also criticised elite broker clubs, saying he would outlaw them if he could. With brokers given access to better speed of applications, this was “unreasonable” and “completely unfair” to the borrower.

“You have an innocent borrower at the backend there. He’s sitting behind a broker who may only give a specific lender one deal every three months,” he said. “That gets penalised because they don’t have the volume. It’s got nothing to do with the borrower.”

When asked about soft dollar benefits, White said that these incentives needed to become more transparent although completely outlawing them may not be the best solution.

There was also nothing wrong with the current base model of commissions that brokers are paid today, he said, referring to the FBAA’s global research that found Australian brokers were paid below the global average. As for trail, this provided a number of positive consumer outcomes when it was introduced.

“With trail being brought into place, that was there to minimise the outcome of churn and also to provide a greater level of service to the borrower that wasn’t necessarily being provided by the banks.”

The FBAA’s research showed that taking away trail led to higher upfront commissions, a greater level of churn, and sales of additional products that may not be acceptable in the market.

Finally, White expressed his opposition to the fixed upfront commission recommended by consumer advocacy group CHOICE.

“The baseline of lending is very standard,” he said. “But it’s the knowledge and capabilities of what adds onto that to make it appropriate to that borrower’s specific needs or their lending structure. That becomes quite a significant skill set and it’s not the same.

“If you do a mum and dad home loan for example, that’s a very different transaction to doing development finance and working through feasibility studies and presales and all the research and due diligence that goes into that.”

Although these are generally higher loan sizes, the amount of work definitely increased as well, he said.

Related stories:
Sedgwick shoots down commissions linked to loan size

ASIC remuneration review has limitations, say broker associations

COMMENTS

  • by Brado 28/04/2017 9:04:58 AM

    right on Peter!!!

  • by Tana 28/04/2017 11:12:04 AM

    Well done! how about claw back clause? 2- year is just too long

  • by David 28/04/2017 11:39:57 AM

    Where is MFAA on this????

    This is why I am switching to FBAA.

    I don't have an issue with broker elite clubs getting priority service. As a lending advisor, the time it takes to get approval is part of the decision making process.

    However, priority service shouldn't be based on dollars or number of deals submitted.

    I believe it should be based on the quality of the applications submitted.

    If a broker is continually sending in applications that are entered correctly into the software, quality notes, comprehensive and clear supporting document files, that are indexed correctly, with upfront vals completed they should receive priority processing