Brokers urged to answer online questions

by Rebecca Pike15 May 2018

A former mortgage industry professional is challenging brokers to be more present and available for their customers.

The founder of online marketplace simplyaskit wants brokers and other industry professionals to be able to answer questions directly from consumers on the platform.

simplyaskit is a digital space where people can ask questions and receive answers from professionals in the relevant space.

Founder, Paul Ryan, said recent scrutiny of the financial services sector had made this venture very important.

He added, “It’s very clear that there is very little trust in the financial services industry. The horrendous stories from the Royal Commission are all the proof we need.

“There are some fantastic advisers and industry experts who are tired of their reputations being tarnished by the actions of their peers.

“I keep hearing bank CEOs saying they need to bridge the trust gap. They’re nice words but there’s no meaningful action.

 “A question was asked the other day if it was possible to buy a property to live in through a self-managed superfund and two industry experts came back with ‘no’ being the answer.

“Within a couple of hours of the question being asked, everyone visiting the platform could go back to their adviser and say that advice you gave me is not correct. This would have saved some people tens of thousands of dollars.”

Ryan  is challenging the banks, financial services providers and the insurance industry to be more proactive in bridging the trust gap by mandating their advisers, bank managers and mortgage brokers to be on simplyaskit and available to answer consumers’ questions.

Ryan, a finance professional for over 25 years founded simplyaskit as an open marketplace to ensure people always had access to accountable information so they can make better, informed decisions.

 

Related stories:
Support of open banking to "revolutionise" industry
Reverse mortgage plans a positive step
Regulators are being 'funded for action'